Tag Archives: differentiation

Noob, Master or Wizard

Differentiation is a focus this year, not only at my school, but also in the region. This has meant that there is a massive push to make a range of strategies more explicit in our programs and units of work.

So, what is Differentiation?

It involves the use of teaching, learning and assessment strategies that are fair and flexible, provide an appropriate level of challenge, and engage students in learning in meaningful ways. Differentiated programming recognises an interrelationship between teaching, learning and assessment that informs future teaching and learning.

http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/support-materials/differentiated-programming/

Being unique and different isn't all that bad

Being unique and different isn’t all that bad


The concept began as a strategy to enable Gifted and Talented learners to be challenged in mainstream classrooms. The realisation is all students learn in different ways and when provided with a range of ways to problem solve, a choice of product outcomes and the opportunity to work at a pace that suits them, students will achieve better and more to their potential. No longer is the “one size fits all” solution adequate in the 21st Century classroom.

There are a few suggested strategies that can be used. These include:

  • Differentiating the process or activities
  • Differentiating the product outcome or assessment
  • Differentiating the content and materials
  • Differentiate the environment

All the above can be further explained when you examine the following models:

How does this translate in the classroom?

I feel confident from teaching the GATS class that I am able to accomplish these ideas when programming and implementing a unit of work. But when we sat down to discuss it as a faculty, there was a need to have it more explicit and each concept defined and used clearly by each teacher. (Now there is irony – teach in a differentiated way, but don’t program like it! HAHA!) There was also a push from above for each faculty to focus on one strategy to become experts at it – the Art department scored Extended Brainstorming. The more that I thought about it and read about differentiation, the more clear it was to me, that in Art we are really lucky. While we teach students a skill in using materials, the concept development and inevitable outcome, is always differentiated. Students are always working at their own pace and some extend their artmaking when they feel confident, while others are more complacent.

For me, reflecting upon my classes, I thought perhaps I had let my Visual Design class down. Because I teach in such an open-ended manner, I feared that maybe they weren’t developing good enough Graphic Design skills, and some were not all confident with using Photoshop. I don’t like to set down in stone HOW to use the software, I figure that as they problem solve and decide on a visual concept, they are going to have to learn how to use the software, to make it do what they want.

In saying this, I decided to PRE-TEST their skills. I gave them a task that was open-ended, but the end product was like a test of their developing skills.

Here are some of their products.

There is such a range. But it really challenged them and gave them the chance to really showcase what they could or couldn’t do.

So, are you a NOOB, MASTER or WIZARD?

Once complete, I assigned the students the next design brief. However, I based it upon these previous submissions. I was going to tell them what to do, but let them choose. I let them choose from 3 possible project – each increasing in difficulty.

The NOOB task is for students that are developing their Photoshop skills.

The MASTER task is for students that are able to use Photoshop, but not always confident.

The WIZARD task is for the super dooper students who want a challenge and know what they are doing.

The feedback discussions we had about where they were placed in their ability was great, and now the are all doing something that they are enjoying and with enough challenge to learn new and develop their skills.

What are some things you have tried to differentiate in your classroom?


And then… more BYOD!

It has been over a week now that the students in one Year 7 class have had their devices in the classroom.

So far…..

TALKING TO TEACHERS

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When I realised that there were so many different types of devices being used, I told the principal that there needed to be a meeting with the teachers to explain the different platforms and capabilities. I also felt that I should encourage them to experiment with new approaches to their lessons so that they were more student-centered and driven by the access to technology.

Questions raised were things like:

Q. What do you do when they are playing games?

A: Ask them to stop, sit with them ask what the game is. Ask them if they think it is relevant to the class. Sit with them until they die and lose the level!! (A teacher sitting next to the is a little off putting!! HEHE)

Q. How can I get the PDF of the textbook onto an iPad?

A: There are some apps that allow you to share files… or you can chunk the textbook and break the file up by chapter using Adobe Acrobat Pro. (Or maybe there is an alternative to using a textbook….??)

Q: I wanted to use a flash resource, but I am disappointed because students with iPads can’t use this resource

A: Sharing is caring… or ask students to find an alternative

Q: Are we here because the parents have said we are not using the laptops in class?

A: *pause* *shocked look on face* No, you are here so I can answer any of your questions

I gave them a sheet that simplified the tools on each device and summarised what the students had.

TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES

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The epic tech dude and my twitter PLN helped us to figure out why the PC’s weren’t connecting to the schools DER wireless network. Because we didn’t give any specs to kids about laptops, and perhaps we didn’t realise at the time…. but if students are to have a PC – they need their wireless card to run at 5GHz…!! Many PC’s seem to have 2.4GHz cards and these will NOT connect to the network. There is a way to get a USB adaptor that converts the 2.4 to a 5GHz – but of course this is not ideal.

THE STUDENTS

The kids are total keen beans and are loving the freedom having their own device has.

I was amused in class the other day, when I saw three boys huddled around some papers. I looked and saw that it was a 5 page worksheet stapled together. I asked what they were doing.

2 said, “We haven’t done our homework!”

ME: “And??? What are you doing now???”

BOYS: Copying his work

ME: See, this is why I think technology can make class more engaging. You guys are never going to remember this stuff if you are just filling in a cloze passage and a table. What if we googled what was on the sheet.

*insert google search here*

ME: Look at this, heaps of sites that can explain this content to you….

At this point I walked away, shaking my head. 3 minutes later, one of the boys came up to me and asked for my help.

He had found a tutorial online relating to the content on the worksheet. He was following the steps, and inputting data into Excel but needed help making it into a graph. I showed him how.

ALL 3 BOYS: WOW! That is so cool Miss!

*smile on my face*

ME: Yes it is… and how much more have you learnt now….!!!!